Precinct News

Precinct One Serves up Poetry, Singing and More at Spring Tea

Women dressed up in colorful dresses and Sunday hats and men donned their fine suits to enjoy Harris County Precinct One’s Spring Tea at the Hardy Seniors Center.

An estimated 350 Precinct One residents attended the annual tea and luncheon, which was held April 26 and featured singing, a drama sketch, a poetry reading and raffle.

“Now, I don’t know if I’m at the wrong event,” Commissioner Rodney Ellis said in greeting those attending the luncheon. “They told me there were 300 ‘seniors’ in here. You all look gorgeous. The women are beautiful and the men are so handsome.”

Seniors who attend Precinct One’s community centers also were treated to a warm welcome from Commissioner Ellis’ wife, Licia Green-Ellis, who also posed for photographs with some of the lunch attendees and passed out flowers during the raffle.

Mrs. Green-Ellis told the audience that her husband will continue to build on Precinct One’s Seniors Program and she urged them to take full advantage of the Precinct’s vibrant programming designed especially for them.  

“This Spring Tea is what all of the programs are about – improving the lives of our residents here in Harris County Precinct One,” she said.

As part of the entertainment, the Seniors Drama Program, directed by playwright Thomas Meloncon, performed a two-woman excerpt from the play, “Life Comes with Directions.” Wayne King, the Drama Program’s music coordinator, sang two songs and Bruce Austin read two of his poems.

The main attractions were the contests for the best hats and teacups brought by the attendees. Seven women were recognized for the best hats, while 11 were honored for having the best teacups, including one purchased at the famed Harrods in London.

Jamie Castaneda, who attends Hardy Seniors Center, said her daughter bought the Harrods cup while traveling to London.

“I wasn’t even expecting it,” she said. “I was very surprised (at being selected).”

Dianne Stephens, who participates in programs at the Julia C. Hester House, said the hat she wore belonged to her late mother. “She would be too pleased because she loved her hats,” Ms. Stephens said. 

Dorenda Longoria of Hardy wore a beautiful hat with decorative flowers that she made from printer paper.

“I was surprised (when my name was called) because I wasn’t called until the very last,” she said. “And I said, ‘All right, all right!’”